Quincy Smelter Tour

The Quincy Smelter site in Ripley, part of the Keweenaw National Historical Park but owned by Franklin Township, was open for tours last weekend. Although I’ve been busy hitting the books and writing the first chapter of my thesis (thus not updating this site very often), I was able to swing down and catch an afternoon tour last Saturday.  Below you will find a few samples of photos from that day.  For more information about touring the Quincy Smelter site please visit the Quincy Smelter Association’s blog. Tours are typically offered sporadically throughout the summer and fall.  The last time to see the tour this year is on October 12 from 12-4. Tours begin every hour on the hour. I hope to resume my “Today in the Strike” posts by next week.

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Don’t Be a Scab!

The dog's vest says "Don't go to Calumet or Hancock Mich, where all miners are on a strike. The reverse side of the vest discouraged people from going to break the strike in the Colorado coalfields.

The dog’s vest says “Don’t go to Calumet or Hancock Mich, where all miners are on a strike.” The reverse side of the vest discouraged people from going to break the strike in the Colorado coalfields. (Photo courtesy of the Miners’ Magazine)

The Miners’ Magazine, a weekly publication of the Western Federation of Miners had an interesting story in the October 30th, 1913 issue. “A Valuable Dog,” pictured above, was put to good use on the streets of Chicago to discourage men from moving to the Copper Country or the Colorado coal fields to break those strikes. M.J. Riley of the WFM and P. W. Quinn of the United Mine Workers of America utilized the dog as a publicity tool to inform people of the strikes taking place “against the arrogant despotism of industrial tyrants.”[1] In addition to highlighting the dog, the article spoke directly to the realities of class conflict (within and between classes) and appealed to men to awaken to the guiding principles of the labor movement.  Apparently sentiment of solidarity can come in all shapes and sizes.  A special thanks to Dr. Susan Martin and Alice Margerum for bringing my attention to this unique photo.


[1] “A Valuable Dog,” The Miners’ Magazine, October 30, 1913, page 7.